India's Non-Personal Data (NPD) framework

India's Non-Personal Data (NPD) framework

Knowledge repo, archives and collaborations

Latest:

  1. Video of talk by Usha Ramanathan on Eminent Domain and how this applies to data regulations in India
  2. NPD primer in Bengali: https://hasgeek.com/PrivacyMode/non-personal-data/sub/smssttigt-tthyer-prstaabit-kaatthaamo-gorraar-ktha-EGuxrZPF9k99WAia3FFADU

About the Non-Personal Data (NPD) framework for India: Non-personal data (NPD) is defined as anything which is not personal data. Read primer on NPD in English, Hindi and Malayalam for a quick understanding how NPD will be regulated in India.

The Committee of Experts (CoE), led by Kris Gopalakrishnan, prepared the first version of the NPD framework in July 2020. Based on the feedback received, the CoE released V2 of the NPD framework in December 2020.

Community submissions to improve the NPD framework for India: NPD Week was conducted to draw recommendations from the community on what apsects of the NPD framework should be revised, with practical suggestions. At the end of NPD Week, a document of community recommendations was drawn up. View final recommendations (PDF) for NPD V2.
These recommendations were submitted to the CoE and MeITY on 31 January 2021.

NPD Survey: Between November 2020 and January 2021, Privacy Mode’s research team interviewed 50 respondents from startup, engineering, product and investor communities to understand their concerns with the Non-Personal Data Report V1 and NPD Report V2. View the report (PDF)


Recap of NPD Week: Between 22 and 29 January, concerns were articulated with respect to NPD’s potential impact around privacy. These concerns were on issues of:

Contact details: For inquiries, call 7676332020 or email privacymode@hasgeek.com. Follow #PrivacyMode on Twitter

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Usha R

Eminent Domain and expropriation of data - India's data regulations

Submitted Feb 13, 2021

Eminent domain was a doctrine devised to let the state take private land for a public purpose. Compensation was to convert this act of forcible expropriation into acquisition. In India, the Land Acquisition Act of 1894 embodied this doctrine.

This development project has banked on the state being able to take land, forests, minerals, water for purposes it identifies.

From about the mid-’80s, resistance and protest against forcible land acquisition, and against this understanding of eminent domain, led to massive changes in the law - the right to fair compensation and transparency in land acquisition, rehabilitation and resettlement Act 2013 and the Scheduled tribes and other traditional forest dwellers (recognition of forest rights) Act 2006 and the Panchayat (extension to scheduled areas) Act 1996 being among the most prominent.

It is now the turn of data. The data-fication of personal data, the planting of the notion of personal data as a public good, the commodification of data, the rendering irrelevant of consent, the idea of ‘trickle up’, are part of what is seen as necessary to let the business in data get established. Then there is the disappearing distance between voluntary and mandatory, the deliberate erasure of privacy, state support for data businesses by establishing data bases, with ubiquity and function creep as markers.

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Deep dives into privacy and security, and understanding needs of the Indian tech ecosystem through guides, research, collaboration, events and conferences. Sponsors: Privacy Mode’s programmes are sponsored by: more